Marine Corps Physical Fitness Test (PFT)

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How to score well on the Marine physical fitness test
Marine Officer Candidates from Charlie and Delta Company attending Officer Candidate Class-220 complete their initial physical fitness test at Brown Field aboard Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, on Jan. 20, 2016. (Cpl. Patrick H. Ownes/U.S. Marine Corps photo)

Fitness is essential to the day-to-day effectiveness and combat readiness of the Marine Corps.

The service considers physical fitness an indispensable aspect of leadership. The habits of self-discipline required to gain and maintain a high level of physical fitness are inherent to the Marine Corps way of life and must be a part of the character of every Marine. Marines who are not physically fit can be a detriment to the readiness and combat efficiency of their units.

Accordingly, every Marine will engage in an effective physical conditioning program on a continuing and progressive basis.

Marines will perform "dead-hang" pull-ups or push-ups, abdominal crunches or plank pose, and a three-mile run. Marines can opt out of pull-ups and perform push-ups, but you cannot max the PFT if push-ups are performed. If you max the pull-ups, you can score 100 points for that event. If you max the push-ups, you only get 70 points for that event, so your max possible PFT score will be 270.

Focus on building your strength to max the PFT. Don't even concern yourself with the minimum standards because you have to score even higher now, as of 2019. The minimum passing score for both the physical fitness test (PFT) and combat fitness test (CFT) has changed. Marines cannot score the old minimum standards and still pass, enforcing the mantra, "Exceeding the standard is the standard." Male and female Marines also have to perform a greater amount of pull-ups to max the pull-up test now.

Male/female pull-up standards (max/min)

Male Marine Pull-up Standards/Age
Age Group Minimum Maximum
17-20 4 20
21-25 5 23
26-30 5 23
31-35 5 23
36-40 5 21
41-45 5 20
46-50 5 19
51+ 4 19

 

Female Marine pull-up standards/age
Age Group Minimum Maximum
17-20 1 7
21-25 3 11
26-30 4 12
31-35 3 11
36-40 3 10
41-45 2 8
46-50 2 6
51+ 2 4

The maximum score is 100 points, with the minimum 40 for each age group.

If you don't want to do pull-ups, push-ups are now an acceptable alternative:

Male/female push-up standards (max/min)

Male Marine Push-up Standards/Age
Age Group Minimum Maximum
17-20 42 82
21-25 40 87
26-30 39 84
31-35 36 80
36-40 34 76
41-45 30 72
46-50 25 68
51+ 20 64

The maximum score is 70 points; the minimum is 40 for each age group.

Female Marine Push-up Standards/Age
Age Group Minimum Maximum
17-20 19 42
21-25 18 48
26-30 18 50
31-35 16 46
36-40 14 43
41-45 12 41
46-50 11 40
51+ 10 38

Male/female crunch standards/age

Male Marine Crunches Standards/Age
Age Group Minimum Maximum
17-20 70 105
21-25 70 110
26-30 70 115
31-35 70 115
36-40 70 110
41-45 65 105
46-50 50 100
51+ 40 100

 

Female Marine Crunch Standards/Age
Age Group Minimum Maximum
17-20 50 100
21-25 55 105
26-30 60 110
31-35 60 105
36-40 60 105
41-45 55 100
46-50 50 100
51+ 40 100

*Note: As of Jan. 1, 2020, Marines will be able to replace crunches with the plank pose. Practice getting a five-minute plank post to max the test.

Male/female 3-mile run standards/age

Male Marine 3-Mile Standards/Age
Age Group Minimum Maximum
17-20 27:40 18:00
21-25 27:40 18:00
26-30 28:00 18:00
31-35 28:20 18:00
36-40 28:40 18:00
41-45 29:20 18:30
46-50 30:00 19:00
51+ 33:00 19:30

 

Female Marine 3-Mile Standards/Age
Age Group Minimum Maximum
17-20 30:50 21:00
21-25 30:50 21:00
26-30 31:10 21:00
31-35 31:30 21:00
36-40 31:50 21:00
41-45 32:30 21:30
46-50 33;30 22:00
51+ 36:00 22:30

The Marine Corps PCP has two main components -- the physical fitness test and the body composition program.

Many PT programs to train for the Marine Corps PFT can be found in the following Military.com links:

Other Marine Corps fitness-related links:

Stew Smith is a former Navy SEAL and fitness author certified as a Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) with the National Strength and Conditioning Association. Visit his Fitness eBook store if you’re looking to start a workout program to create a healthy lifestyle. Send your fitness questions to stew@stewsmith.com.

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