Under the Radar

'Aircraft Carrier: Guardian of the Seas' Offers Breathtaking Look at Navy Technology

A screenshot from "Aircraft Carrier: Guardian of the Seas," which features the Nimitz-class USS Ronald Reagan and more than 20 nations participating in the RimPac training exercise.
A screenshot from "Aircraft Carrier: Guardian of the Seas," which features the Nimitz-class USS Ronald Reagan and more than 20 nations participating in the RimPac training exercise.

The IMAX smash "Aircraft Carrier: Guardian of the Seas" has just been released by Shout Factory home video in a 4K Ultra HD, Blu-ray and Digital Copy set. IMAX movies have been a great source of 4K home video content, and this film is one of the best you can find for a home setup.

The film joints the Nimitz-class carrier Ronald Reagan as it participates in RIMPAC, the world's largest joint maritime training exercise. Nothing compares with the overwhelming experience of being on one of these ships in person, but this movie does an admirable job of capturing the scope and size of life on an aircraft carrier.

Gearheads will enjoy the extensive detail about the mechanical workings of the ship, including animated recreations that show the inner workings of some technology that isn't easily accessible on board the ships.

Since the Navy uses movies like they are recruiting tools, there's also a basic history of naval warfare for the school kids who get bused into the museums that show this kind of film.

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Most importantly, these visuals do not disappoint. One of the complications of owning a fancy new 4K HDR television and the still-expensive 4K Blu-ray players is that many filmmakers aren't yet adapting their working styles to take advantage of the new, higher-resolution technology.

"Aircraft Carrier: Guardian of the Seas" was conceived for the giant, immersive IMAX format, and the stunning visuals required for that setting translate beautifully to 4K. If you've got the right home setup, this one is a great choice that will let you enjoy your investment to its full potential.

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